Quotes – Thomas Paine and Paulo Freire (Pedagogy of the Oppressed)

Posted: November 7, 2014 in Musings
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Radical writer Thomas Paine (1739 – 1809) wrote:

“A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right.”

In The Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire, he identified that:

“Leaders who do not act dialogically, but insist on imposing their decisions, do not organize the people… they manipulate them. They do not liberate, nor are they liberated: they Oppress.”

“you do not have to be passively oppressed, it is not a law of nature”

– Noam Chomsky lecture on one of my favourite books Paulo Freire “Pedagogy of the Oppressed”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SOw55BU7yg#t=678

also;

“The oppressed, having internalized the image of the oppressor and adopted his guidelines, are fearful of freedom.”
― Paulo FreirePedagogy of the Oppressed 

(I think this paragraph is almost directly linked to
Plato's allegory "The Cave". Where the slave-like cave
dwellers are fearful of the light outside of the cave?)

“[T]he more radical the person is, the more fully he or she enters into reality so that, knowing it better,
he or she can transform it.
This individual is not afraid to confront, to listen, to see the world unveiled.
This person is not afraid to meet the people or to enter into a dialogue with them.
This person does not consider himself/herself the proprietor of history or of all people, or the liberator of the oppressed; but he or she does commit himself/herself, within history,
to fight at their side.”

Education either functions as an instrument which is used to facilitate integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity or it becomes the practice of freedom, the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world.”

― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

“The oppressors do not favour promoting the community as a whole, but rather selected leaders.”

― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

“For apart from inquiry, apart from the praxis, individuals cannot be truly human. Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient, continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other.”

“The Radical, committed to human liberation, does not become the prisoner of a ‘circle of certainty’ within which reality is also imprisoned.
On the contrary, the more radical the person is, the more fully he or she enters into reality so that, knowing it better, he or she can better transform it.
This individual is not afraid to confront, to listen, to see the world unveiled.
This person is not afraid to meet the people or to enter into dialogue with them.
This person does not consider himself or herself the proprietor of history or of all people, or the liberator of the oppressed; but he or she does commit himself or herself, within history, to fight at their side.”

― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, pg57.

“The oppressors’ tranquility rests on how well men and women fit the world they, the oppressors, have created and how little the people question it.”

― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, pg53

“knowledge emerges only through invention and reinvention, the restless,impatient,continuing,hopeful inquiry beings with the world and with others.”

― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

“…the fact that certain members of the oppressor class join the oppressed in their struggle for liberation, thus moving from one pole of the contradiction to the other… Theirs is a fundamental role, and has been throughout the history of this struggle. It happens, however, that as they cease to be exploiters or indifferent spectators or simply the heirs of exploitation and move to the side of the exploited, they almost always bring with them the marks of their origin: their prejudices and their deformations, which include a lack of confidence in the people’s ability to think, to want, and to know. Accordingly, these adherents to the people’s cause constantly run the risk of falling into a type of generosity as malefic as that of the oppressors.

The generosity of the oppressors is nourished by an unjust order, which must be maintained in order to justify that generosity.
Our converts, on the other hand, truly desire to transform the unjust order; but because of their background they believe that they must be the executors of the transformation.
They talk about the people, but they do not trust them; and trusting the people is the indispensable precondition for revolutionary change.
A real humanist can be identified more by his trust in the people, which engages him in their struggle, than by a thousand actions in their favor without that trust.”

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