Posts Tagged ‘art’

#ThingsTheDogLickedNext is a return to my 2013 street art museum Project “a Fecal Matter”

The subject matter was dog shit and the transfer of the parasite Toxicara Canis into the human food chain and eventually, children. See link:

https://discordion.wordpress.com/my-art/self-directed-ap3-degree-project-exhibition-may-2013/2013-foundation-degree-museum-project-a-fecal-matter/

December is here, along with the dark nights I’m sure all of you have experience of our neighbourhood dog walkers leaving “secret Santa” packages dotted around our pedestrian walkways?

So, I’d love to reciprocate and give our secret Santas something back in the way of our suggestions to the question; What are the Things The Dog Licked Next?

Please add your “thing the dog licked next” to the Twitter hashtag.

Depending on how this goes I may set myself further goals such as building an artwork from #ThingsTheDogLickedNext

 

We Are Without Excuse.

Ghosts Of The Future | A film (by my comrade) Kelvin Mason.

His Observations on the Famous Novel (1937)


Written: 1937
First Published: Joan London, Jack London and His Times,
Source: The New International, Vol. XI No. 3, April 1945, p. 95.
Transcription/Mark-up: Einde O’Callaghan.
Copyleft: Leon Trotsky Internet Archive (www.marxists.org) 2016. Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1937/xx/ironheel.htm


Trotsky’s commentary on Jack London’s great classic, The Iron Heel, was written in Mexico some time in 1937. Originally, it was published as part of the biography, Jack London and His Times, written by his daughter, Joan London, to whose courtesy we are obliged for its reproduction in these pages. Joan London writes us that an earlier letter from Trotsky explained why The Iron Heel struck him so forcibly, due to the fact that he had been unaware of its existence until she sent him a copy. It is not necessary to add anything else to what we print here by Trotsky, except to note that the abruptness of its opening sentence is due to the omission from the original published text of the first paragraph. – Editor

… The book produced upon me – I speak without exaggeration – a deep impression. Not because of its artistic qualities: the form of the novel here represents only an armor for social analysis and prognosis. The author is intentionally sparing in his use of artistic means. He is himself interested not so much in the individual fate of his heroes as in the fate of mankind. By this, however, I don’t want at all to belittle the artistic value of the work, especially in its last chapters beginning with the Chicago commune. The pictures of civil war develop in powerful frescoes. Nevertheless, this is not the main feature. The book surprised me with the audacity and independence of its historical foresight.

The world workers’ movement at the end of the last and the beginning of the present century stood under the sign of reformism. The perspective of peaceful and uninterrupted world progress, of the prosperity of democracy and social reforms, seemed to be assured once and for all. The first Russian revolution, it is true, revived the radical flank of the German social-democracy and gave for a certain time dynamic force to anarcho-syndicalism in France. The Iron Heel bears the undoubted imprint of the year 1905. But at the time when this remarkable book appeared, the domination of counterrevolution was already consolidating itself in Russia. In the world arena the defeat of the Russian proletariat gave to reformism the possibility not only of regaining its temporarily lost positions but also of subjecting to itself completely the organized workers’ movement. It is sufficient to recall that precisely in the following seven years (1907–14) the international social-democracy ripened definitely for its base and shameful role during the World War.

Jack London not only absorbed creatively the impetus given by the first Russian revolution but also courageously thought over again in its light the fate of capitalist society as a whole. Precisely those problems which the official socialism of this time considered to be definitely buried: the growth of wealth and power at one pole, of misery and destitution at the other pole; the accumulation of social bitterness and hatred; the unalterable preparation of bloody cataclysms – all those questions Jack London felt with an intrepidity which forces one to ask himself again and again with astonishment: when was this written? Really before the war?

One must accentuate especially the role which Jack London attributes to the labor bureaucracy and to the labor aristocracy in the further fate of mankind. Thanks to their support, the American plutocracy not only succeeds in defeating the workers’ insurrection but also in keeping its iron dictatorship during the following three centuries. We will not dispute with the poet the delay which can but seem to us too long. However, it is not a question of Jack London’s pessimism, but of his passionate effort to shake those who are lulled by routine, to force them to open their eyes and to see what is and what approaches. The artist is audaciously utilizing the methods of hyperbole. He is bringing the tendencies rooted in capitalism: of oppression, cruelty, bestiality, betrayal, to their extreme expression. He is operating with centuries in order to measure the tyrannical will of the exploiters and the treacherous rôle of the labor bureaucracy. But his most “romantic” hyperboles are finally much more realistic than the bookkeeper-like calculations of the so-called “sober politicians.”

It is easy to imagine with what a condescending perplexity the official socialist thinking of that time met Jack London’s menacing prophecies. If one took the trouble to look over the reviews of The Iron Heel at that time in the German Neue Zeit and Vorwärts, in the Austrian Kampf and Arbeiterzeitung, as well as in the other socialist publications of Europe and America, he could easily convince himself that the thirty-year-old “romanticist” saw incomparably more clearly and farther than all the social-democratic leaders of that time taken together. But Jack London bears comparison in this domain not only with the reformists. One can say with assurance that in 1907 not one of the revolutionary Marxists, not excluding Lenin and Rosa Luxemburg, imagined so fully the ominous perspective of the alliance between finance capital and labor aristocracy. This suffices in itself to determine the specific weight of the novel.

The chapter, The Roaring Abysmal Beast, undoubtedly constitutes the focus of the book. At the time when the novel appeared this apocalyptical chapter must have seemed to be the boundary of hyperbolism. However, the consequent happenings have almost surpassed it. And the last word of class struggle has not yet been said by far! The “Abysmal Beast” is to the extreme degree oppressed, humiliated, and degenerated people. Who would now dare to speak for this reason about the artist’s pessimism? No, London is an optimist, only a penetrating and farsighted one. “Look into what kind of abyss the bourgeoisie will hurl you down, if you don’t finish with them!” This is his thought.

Today it sounds incomparably more real and sharp than thirty years ago. But still more astonishing is the genuinely prophetic vision of the methods by which the Iron Heel will sustain its domination over crushed mankind. London manifests remarkable freedom from reformistic pacifist illusions. In this picture of the future there remains not a trace of democracy and peaceful progress. Over the mass of the deprived rise the castes of labor aristocracy, of praetorian army, of an all-penetrating police, with the financial oligarchy at the top. In reading it one does not believe his own eyes: it is precisely the picture of fascism, of its economy, of its governmental technique, its political psychology! The fact is incontestable: in 1907 Jack London already foresaw and described the fascist regime as the inevitable result of the defeat of the proletarian revolution. Whatever may be the single “errors” of the novel – and they exist – we cannot help inclining before the powerful intuition of the revolutionary artist.

This is a superb documentary about muslim Cartoonists, researching the aftermath of terrorist attacks in Paris from Charlie Hebdo to the Bataclan, well worth 25minutes of your time. It covers Jordanians, Afghani’s, Lebanese and Iranians who risk their lives to create satirical cartoons. They caricature ISIS/Daesh, USA, Saudis & Mohammed.

Literally some of the bravest artists still alive.

A picture is worth a thousand words, as the old saying goes and cartoonists have, for thousands of years, used art as satire, to speak out about what’s wrong with society. By definition, the work discusses, and even ridicules, the hot, current and controversial subjects of the day to draw attention to important issues and provoke dialogue. The objective may simply be to illustrate the funny side of a story or, of course, to precipitate change and make a difference. Because of that potential power and influence, many countries impose strict limits on the topics they allow cartoonists to address, topping the taboo list are politics, religion and sex.

It is not simply because of unwritten rules of local morality that comic illustrators are required to steer clear of cartoons depicting certain subjects if they don’t want to be thrown in jail or get killed by zealous extremists. Not everywhere enjoys freedom of speech as a guaranteed right and in such places, the cost of a simple satirical sketch can even be life itself. In some parts of the world, the job means a constant battle between an artist’s convictions and desire to live.

RT Doc visits Jordan, Lebanon, Iran and Afghanistan to meet local cartoonists and explore how satirists ply their trade against a backdrop of harsh government censorship and death threats from religious fanatics. The film examines the boundaries within which cartoonists often have to work. After the Charlie Hebdo massacre, we ask the cartoonists about their attitudes to their French colleagues’ work and the tragedy that killed them. Our contributors also discuss why the magazine’s cartoons caused such fatal controversy.

https://youtu.be/yJeaRhSg1pA

 

 

 

 

Sat drinking a cup of tea and cogitation starts as usual. I’ve been away from my blog for a long time.

I’m trying to reconcile how one of the main areas of growth in art in the last few years has been in what’s now been dubbed “Post-atrocity Art”, it’s got it’s own label, it’s become a thing and probably it’ll soon be an area of study – no doubt there’s a thesis there.
And it, Post-atrocity Art, has burgeoned, I almost said exploded but stopped myself, due to the prevalence of Social Media and everyone’s desire to display. The latest symbol is the painted symbol of the CND chicken-foot incorporating the Eiffel Tower.
There is a market and now a commodity for collective grief, is it grief? Is it a genuine wish to connect with others and show sympathy and unity through symbolism? Or is it something else? Is there vanity involved as well? There is a correlation to the Post-Diana reaction.

It’s probably worthy of research as a psycho-social phenomenon?

The paradox of the superego:
the more you obey what the Other demands of you, the guiltier you are.

The song “If You Tolerate This Your Children Will Be Next” by the Manic Street Preachers, takes its name from the stark warning of a Republican Ministry of Propaganda poster during the Spanish Civil War, displaying a photograph of a young child killed by the Nationalists under a sky of bombers. It’s essence illustrating the paradox of the superego.

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http://www.iwm.org.uk/ Catalogue number Art.IWM PST 8661 Production date 1936 Place made Spain Subject period Second World War Materials medium: lithograph support: paper Dimensions Support: Height 670 mm Support: Width 494 mm Mount: Height 670 mm Mount: Width 495 mm Frame: Height 448 mm Frame: Width 325 mm Frame: Depth 20 mm Alternative Names object category: Poster Creator: Augusto [attributed] (artist) Ministerio de Propaganda (publisher/sponsor) Category posters All Rights Reserved except for Fair Dealing exceptions otherwise permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

For if you are willing to tolerate what successive governments and regimes force upon you; from ideological austerity, atrocious policies attacking the Independent Living Allowance of just 18,000 of the most severely disabled in the UK to swingeing local authority cuts such as the removal of hot meal services for our elderly or removal of 7 out of 11 leisure centres in the Rhymney valley CCBC area, or imposition of car parking charges on the sick and disabled at our country parks.

IF YOU STAND FOR THIS, YOU”LL LAY DOWN FOR ANYTHING!


Happy Bastille Day! Vive la republique!

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When you begin to sit down and assess every atrocity happening right now, not just historically, RIGHT NOW, and then compare this as the Irish people use their democratic right to vote in favour of two adults of the same sex choosing to marry….

Then Read of this;
“The Pope’s right hand man has called the landslide yes vote a

‘defeat for humanity’.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/may/26/vatican-ireland-gay-marriage-referendum-vote-defeat-for-humanity

“I was deeply saddened by the result,” Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican’s secretary of state, said at a conference in Rome on Tuesday night. “The church must take account of this reality, but in the sense that it must strengthen its commitment to evangelisation. I think that you cannot just talk of a defeat for Christian principles, but of a defeat for humanity.”

And when you contemplate the Cardinal’s words and step back to look at the ecological and humanitarian crises he actually SHOULD be directing his comments toward, you realise what an utterly fucked up institution the catholic church and other religious institutions are.
The fact that so many Billions of the Earth’s human population lack the cognition and enlightenment to think and act for themselves and depend on these fucking charlatans makes me “deeply saddened” and see this as the greatest threat, a “defeat for humanity.”

what an incredibly stupid man Cardinal Pietro Parolin undoubtedly is.

link to the quote in The Guardian

Parolin’s remarks on the Irish vote are significant given the broader role Parolin plays in crafting the church’s message on major diplomatic and social issues.

At the time of his appointment in 2013, veteran Vatican reporter John Allen wrote in the National Catholic Reporter that Parolin had been “on the frontlines of shaping the Vatican’s response to virtually every geopolitical challenge of the past two decades”.

Among other issues, the Italian cardinal has been an outspoken advocate for action to combat global warming. In recent remarks, he denounced the “globalisation of indifference and the economy of exclusion” that has put the planet in peril.

He has also been the public face of Francis’s diplomatic efforts, including the church’s role in helping Cuba and the US restore diplomatic ties.

But on Tuesday, with his choice of words, Parolin differed from the pope in one respect: the Argentinian pontiff has also used the phrase “defeat for humanity”, but he was talking about war, not the legalisation of gay marriage.