Posts Tagged ‘death’

Not satire… It’s the Tory scum.

the most expensive MP in Britain is the one given the job of attacks on the poorest and most vulnerable people in Britain…

image

Is it KALI… the HINDU DEATH GODDESS?

 

image No!

it’s Priti by name,

deeply Ugly by nature,

Patel!

Prior to becoming the MOST EXPENSIVE MP IN BRITAIN, she worked as a public relations advisor to British American Tobacco, where she was linked to the sinister ‘Project Sunrise’.

This is believed to be part of the initiative established by cigarette firm Phillip Morris which aimed to create the “dawn of a new day” for the tobacco industry by smearing anti-smoking groups as extremist.

Patel continued supporting the tobacco industry following being elected, voting in favour of ending the smoking ban in 2010 and speaking out against plain cigarette packaging.

Patel also worked in corporate relations for alcohol giant Diageo, whose so-called charitable arm Tomorrow’s People were famously responsible for expecting unemployed unpaid workers to sleep under a bridge during the Queen’s Jubiliee celebrations.

In her new role as Employment Minister she will be responsible for handing out lucrative contracts to manage workfare schemes to organisation’s such as Tomorrow’s People.

She’s also a supporter of Aidan ‘Nazi Boy’ Burley’s Trade Union Reform Campaign (TURC). In 2012 Patel was one of the auth0rs of Brittania Unchained, a nasty diatribe penned by five Tory MPs which accused British workers of being the “worst idlers in the world”.

The book called on the UK workforce to “emulate China”, (where 70,000 people die in workplace accidents every year), or South Korea, (the suicide capital of Asia).

Priti Patel and death have never been far away.

Patel will put money before life at every turn.

This is what the modern Tory Party represents.

That Priti Patel is now in charge of benefit sanctions and sickness benefit assessments that have already claimed a growing number of lives is genuinely chilling.

Death now stalks the corridors of the DWP like never before.

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Aubade 1977 - Philip Larkin

Aubade 1977 – Philip Larkin copyright, Ian Pritchard, Discordion

“Aubade” Philip Larkin, 1977

I work all day, and get half-drunk at night.
Waking at four to soundless dark,
I stare. In time the curtain-edges will grow light.

Till then I see what’s really always there:

Unresting death, a whole day nearer now,

Making all thought impossible but how
And where and when I shall myself die.

Arid interrogation: yet the dread

Of dying, and being dead,

Flashes afresh to hold and horrify.

The mind blanks at the glare. Not in remorse

—The good not done, the love not given, time

Torn off unused—nor wretchedly because

An only life can take so long to climb

Clear of its wrong beginnings, and may never

But at the total emptiness for ever,
The sure extinction that we travel to

And shall be lost in always. Not to be here, 

Not to be anywhere,

And soon; nothing more terrible, nothing more true.

This is a special way of being afraid

No trick dispels. Religion used to try,

That vast moth-eaten musical brocade

Created to pretend we never die,

And specious stuff that says No rational being

Can fear a thing it will not feel, not seeing

That this is what we fear—no sight, no sound,

No touch or taste or smell, nothing to think with,

Nothing to love or link with,

The anaesthetic from which none come round.

And so it stays just on the edge of vision,

A small unfocused blur, a standing chill

That slows each impulse down to indecision.

Most things may never happen: this one will,

And realisation of it rages out

In furnace-fear when we are caught without

People or drink. Courage is no good:

It means not scaring others. Being brave

Lets no one off the grave.

Death is no different whined at than withstood.

Slowly light strengthens, and the room takes shape.

It stands plain as a wardrobe, what we know,

Have always known, know that we can’t escape,

Yet can’t accept. One side will have to go.

Meanwhile telephones crouch, getting ready to ring

In locked-up offices, and all the uncaring

Intricate rented world begins to rouse.

The sky is white as clay, with no sun.

Work has to be done.

Postmen like doctors go from from house to house.

 

 

Obey - by Shepard Fairey, 1989

Obey – by Shepard Fairey, 1989

 

 

MANIFESTO

The OBEY sticker campaign can be explained as an experiment in Phenomenology. Heidegger describes Phenomenology as “the process of letting things manifest themselves.” Phenomenology attempts to enable people to see clearly something that is right before their eyes but obscured; things that are so taken for granted that they are muted by abstract observation.

The FIRST AIM OF PHENOMENOLOGY is to reawaken a sense of wonder about one’s environment. The OBEY sticker attempts to stimulate curiosity and bring people to question both the sticker and their relationship with their surroundings. Because people are not used to seeing advertisements or propaganda for which the product or motive is not obvious, frequent and novel encounters with the sticker provoke thought and possible frustration, nevertheless revitalizing the viewer’s perception and attention to detail. The sticker has no meaning but exists only to cause people to react, to contemplate and search for meaning in the sticker. Because OBEY has no actual meaning, the various reactions and interpretations of those who view it reflect their personality and the nature of their sensibilities.

Many people who are familiar with the sticker find the image itself amusing, recognizing it as nonsensical, and are able to derive straightforward visual pleasure without burdening themselves with an explanation. The PARANOID OR CONSERVATIVE VIEWER however may be confused by the sticker’s persistent presence and condemn it as an underground cult with subversive intentions. Many stickers have been peeled down by people who were annoyed by them, considering them an eye sore and an act of petty vandalism, which is ironic considering the number of commercial graphic images everyone in American society is assaulted with daily.

Another phenomenon the sticker has brought to light is the trendy and CONSPICUOUSLY CONSUMPTIVE nature of many members of society. For those who have been surrounded by the sticker, its familiarity and cultural resonance is comforting and owning a sticker provides a souvenir or keepsake, a memento. People have often demanded the sticker merely because they have seen it everywhere and possessing a sticker provides a sense of belonging. The Giant sticker seems mostly to be embraced by those who are (or at least want to seem to be) rebellious. Even though these people may not know the meaning of the sticker, they enjoy its slightly disruptive underground quality and wish to contribute to the furthering of its humorous and absurd presence which seems to somehow be antiestablishment/societal convention. Giant stickers are both embraced and rejected, the reason behind which, upon examination reflects the psyche of the viewer. Whether the reaction be positive or negative, the stickers existence is worthy as long as it causes people to consider the details and meanings of their surroundings. In the name of fun and observation.

Shepard Fairey, 1990