Posts Tagged ‘Herbert Marcuse’

Summary of: Consumerism as a form of social control.
(extract from my last year’s BA dissertation)

Herbert Marcuse strongly criticizes consumerism, arguing that it is a form of social control.
He suggests* that the system we live in may claim to be democratic, but it is actually Authoritarian in that a few individuals dictate our perceptions of freedom by only allowing us “choices to buy” for happiness.*
In this state of “unfreedom”*… consumers act irrationally by;

  • working more than they are required to in order to fulfil actual basic needs,
  • by ignoring the psychologically destructive effects,
  • by ignoring the waste and environmental damage it causes,
  • and, by searching for social connection through material items*.

* [Marcuse, Herbert (1991). “Introduction to the Second Edition”. One-dimensional Man: studies in ideology of advanced industrial society. London: Routledge. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-415-07429-2.]
* [Marcuse, Herbert (1991). “Introduction to the Second Edition”. One-dimensional Man: studies in ideology of advanced industrial society. London: Routledge. pp. 1, 7. ISBN 978-0-415-07429-2]
* [Marcuse, Herbert (1991). “Chapter 1”. One-dimensional Man: studies in ideology of advanced industrial society. London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-07429-2]

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I make no apologies, here is some more Zizek! 😈💤

Published on Nov 13, 2014

Speaker: Professor Slavoj Zizek
Chair: Dr Purna Sen

Recorded on 11 November 2014 in Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building.

Critique of ideology should not begin with the critique of reality, but with the critique of our dreams. As Herbert Marcuse put it back in the 1960s, freedom (from ideological constraints, from the predominant mode of dreaming) is the condition of liberation.

If we only change reality in order to realize our dreams, and do not change these dreams themselves, we sooner or later regress to old reality. The first act of liberation is therefore for us to become ruthless censors of our dreams.

Slavoj Zizek is a Hegelian philosopher, Lacanian psychoanalyst, and political activist. He is international director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and the author of numerous books on dialectical materialism, critique of ideology and art, including Less Than Nothing, Living in the End Times, First as Tragedy, Then as Farce and The Year of Dreaming Dangerously. This event marks the publication of his new book, Trouble in Paradise: From the End of History to the End of Capitalism.

Purna Sen (@Purna_Sen) is Deputy Director of the Institute of Public Affairs at the LSE.

The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world’s leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives.

Noam Chomsky (2013) on “Pedagogy of the Oppressed”

Published on May 29, 2013
Pedagogy of the Oppressed: Noam Chomsky, Howard Gardner, and Bruno della Chiesa Askwith Forum.
On Wednesday, May 1, the Askwith Forum commemorated the 45th anniversary of the publication of Paolo Freire’s “Pedagogy of the Oppressed” with a discussion about the book’s impact and relevance to education today.

http://youtu.be/-SOw55BU7yg
(“the holy trinity” quote 1hr 29mins)

I have been reading reviews  written in 2010  on the “Eco Pedagogy movement” .It is basically a type of environmental Anarchist movement, with the idea to incorporate the natural environment and all species of life with the human culture (instead of  the current domination , destruction and exploitation of non human species of life), and combines this with the ideolog(ies)  of this author (Freire, Paulo) of “Pedagogy of the Oppressed”  as well as that of Ivan Illich and Herbert Marcuse (American culture from the eyes of the oppressed and the educational system , how that keeps the status quo).Of course, those in power rule public education to indoctrinate and subjugate people in order to  oppress people and to keep them oppressed, thus the great need for changing in the practices of our educational system, in order to make changes in society.

I’ve yet to get my hands on the book though and am anxious to get it, so hopefully I’ll have it soon.

I was excited to find this video as I did not know it existed.Currently Richard Kahn, and others  head  the movement.
The  (NY Peter Lang Publishers, 2010) book  “Critical Pedagogy, Ecoliteracy,  and Planetary Crisis: The Ecopedagogy Movement” by Richard Kahn, The movement’s:
” roots lie within early environmental education and educators’ and philosophers’ teachings including those of:
Paulo Freire (Pedagogy of the Oppressed), Ivan Illich, and Herbert Marcuse.”
And… the Ecopedagogy movement :
” challenges educators to critically engage and join the nascent but growing international ecopedagogy movement.  and seeks  to cultivate and appreciate human beings’ collective and communal potentials in the struggle to achieve convivial life on Earth. ”
“Ecopedagogy as a potential Illichean social and  educational “tool for conviviality,” a tool that creates the possibility for “individual freedom realized in personal interdependence”

Richard Kahn, the nominal leader of the Ecopedagogy movement (as he expanded and bases on Freire, et al),  as stated above. is a Professor at Berkley in Calif. and  can be contacted on FB.