Posts Tagged ‘totalitarianism’

Once Upon A Time…

Weapons were manufactured for Wars.

Now, Wars are manufactured for weapons.

(Arundahti Roy)

 

Aerial bombardment of a Syrian city of 200,000 men, women & children by four UK Tornado warplanes and Brimstone missiles without Syrian government coordination or ground forces back up, now imminent. #SyriaVote #DontBombSyria

 

All 66 Labour MPs who backed bombing Syria

  • Adrian Bailey
  • Alan Campbell
  • Alan Johnson
  • Alison McGovern
  • Angela Eagle
  • Angela Smith
  • Ann Coffey
  • Anna Turley
  • Ben Bradshaw
  • Bridget Phillipson
  • Caroline Flint
  • Chris Bryant
  • Chris Leslie
  • Chuka Umunna
  • Colleen Fletcher
  • Conor McGinn
  • Dan Jarvis
  • Emma Reynolds
  • Frank Field
  • Gareth Thomas
  • Geoffrey Robinson
  • George Howarth
  • Gisela Stuart
  • Gloria De Piero
  • Graham Jones
  • Harriet Harman
  • Heidi Alexander
  • Helen Jones
  • Hilary Benn
  • Holly Lynch
  • Ian Austin
  • Jamie Reed
  • Jenny Chapman
  • Jim Dowd
  • Jim Fitzpatrick
  • Joan Ryan
  • John Spellar
  • John Woodcock
  • Keith Vaz
  • Kevan Jones
  • Kevin Barron
  • Liz Kendall
  • Louise Ellman
  • Luciana Berger
  • Lucy Powell
  • Margaret Beckett
  • Margaret Hodge
  • Maria Eagle
  • Mary Creagh
  • Michael Dugher
  • Neil Coyle
  • Pat McFadden
  • Peter Kyle
  • Phil Wilson
  • Ruth Smeeth
  • Simon Danczuk
  • Siobhain McDonagh
  • Stella Creasy
  • Susan Elan Jones
  • Tom Blenkinsop
  • Tom Watson
  • Tristram Hunt
  • Vernon Coaker
  • Wayne David
  • Yvette Cooper
  • Stephen Doughty

 

Arming ISIS: the hypocrisy of “strutting Napolean” Francois Hollande & his fellow Saudi/Israeli apologists Cameron & Obama…

John Pilger on Paris, ISIS and Media Propaganda

Video Interview
Afshin Rattansi goes underground with John Pilger.

Award winning journalist and author, John Pilger talks to us about how Washington, London and Paris gave birth to ISIS-Daesh. Plus we examine the media’s role in spreading disinformation ahead of a vote in Parliament for UK bombing of Syria. Afshin looks at the Autumn Statement and why in a time of high alert we are cutting the police force and buying drones.

Posted November 25, 2015

Caerphilly MP Wayne David on ITV News today claiming he was “bullied” what a despicable thing to say!
He has no idea what “bullying” actually is and demeans those that are/have been bullied.
He voted with the Tories to drop bombs on children in a city of 200,000 civilians, that’s f***ing bullying!
He chose to join the War Pigs. He should get used to that epithet!

Wayne David (MP Caerphilly) and Chris Bryant (MP Rhondda) – both Labour Friends of Israel.

You will see the Rhondda MP Bryant is busy doing PR for the Brimstone Missiles today!

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At The Sanctuary for Independent Media in Troy, N.Y., May 2015, Truthdig columnist Chris Hedges spoke for over an hour about how his new book, “Wages of Rebellion,” differs from his previous works, including, the public loss of faith in the political process and the revolutionary potential bubbling beneath the surface of American life.

SACRIFICE ZONES

ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS

ECONOMIC CRISIS

UNFETTERED UNREGULATED CAPITALISM

What it takes to Rebel

GLOBAL CAPITALISM

We are passive in front of our electronic hallucinations

Movements of Mass Civil Disobedience

Cornell West

Noam Chomsky

Susan Sontag

Mechanisms of coercion and violence

Paramilitarised police

It struck me that all the aspects of “inverted totalitarianism” (which Hedges highlights and defines early on) can in fact be seen today in the European Union, where the financial industry has in fact made the sovereign governments of member nations subservient to their whim and have even begun to implement what is essentially “inverted socialism” by means of austerity to weaken governments and social programs and then strengthening these same financial industries with bail-outs. (SOCIALISM/ANARCHISM for the Richest, Austerity for Everyone Else!).

The EU is to inverted totalitarianism is to what the USSR is to true totalitarianism, except in the EU we are seeing true socialism applied but to corporations and a kind of “let them eat cake” feudalism to the population.

It’s like the corporate world had been waging a war with the population, which it in fact had been doing, due to the population starting the war by adopting democratic values.

The population then lost the war and is now being punished with a kind of “Treaty of Versailles” where they must pay reparations to the corporate state, just as the Wiemar Republic did after World War 1.

ANOTHER FANTASTIC MUST READ ARTICLE By George Monbiot!

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/18/corruption-rife-britain

 

It just doesn’t compute. Almost every day the news is filled with stories that look to me like corruption. Yet on Transparency International’s corruption index Britain is ranked 14th out of 177 nations, suggesting that it’s one of the best-run nations on Earth. Either all but 13 countries are spectacularly corrupt or there’s something wrong with the index.

Yes, it’s the index. The definitions of corruption on which it draws are narrow and selective. Common practices in the rich nations that could reasonably be labelled corrupt are excluded; common practices in the poor nations are emphasised.

This week a ground-changing book called How Corrupt is Britain?, edited by David Whyte, is published. It should be read by anyone who believes this country merits its position on the index.
Would there still be commercial banking sector in this country if it weren’t for corruption? Think of the list of scandals: pensions mis-selling, endowment mortgage fraud, the payment protection insurance scam, Libor rigging, insider trading and all the rest. Then ask yourself whether fleecing the public is an aberration – or the business model.

No senior figure has been held criminally liable or has even been disqualified for the practices that helped to trigger the financial crisis, partly because the laws that should have restrained them were slashed by successive governments. A former minister in this government ran HSBC while it engaged in systematic tax evasion, money laundering for drugs gangs and the provision of services to Saudi and Bangladeshi banks linked to the financing of terrorists. Instead of prosecuting the bank, the head of the UK’s tax office went to work for it when he retired.

The City of London, operating with the help of British overseas territories and crown dependencies, is the world’s leading tax haven, controlling 24% of all offshore financial services. It offers global capital an elaborate secrecy regime, assisting not just tax evaders but also smugglers, sanctions- busters and money-launderers. As the French investigating magistrate Eva Joly has complained, the City “has never transmitted even the smallest piece of usable evidence to a foreign magistrate”. The UK, Switzerland, Singapore, Luxembourg and Germany are all ranked by Transparency International as among the least corrupt nations in the world. They are also listed by the Tax Justice Network as among the worst secrecy regimes and tax havens. For some reason, though, that doesn’t count.

The Private Finance Initiative has been used by our governments to deceive us about the extent of their borrowing while channelling public money into the hands of corporations. Shrouded in secrecy, stuffed with hidden sweeteners, it has landed hospitals and schools with unpayable debts, while hiding public services from public scrutiny….

State spies have been engaged in mass surveillance. And the police, adopting the identities of dead children, lying in court to assist false convictions and fathering children by activists before disappearing, have infiltrated and sought to destroy peaceful campaign groups. Police forces have protected prolific paedophiles, including Jimmy Savile, and – it is now alleged – a ring of senior politicians who are also suspected of the murder of children.

Savile was shielded too by the NHS and the BBC, which has sacked most of the those who sought to expose him while promoting people who tried to perpetuate the cover-up.

There’s the small matter of our unreformed political funding system, which permits the very rich to buy political parties. There’s the phone-hacking scandal and the payment of police by newspapers, the underselling of Royal Mail, the revolving door allowing corporate executives to draft the laws affecting their businesses, the robbing of the welfare and prison services by private contractors, price-fixing by energy companies, daylight robbery by pharmaceutical firms and dozens more such cases.

Is none of this corruption? Or is it too sophisticated to qualify?

It just doesn’t compute. Almost every day the news is filled with stories that look to me like corruption. Yet on Transparency International’s corruption index Britain is ranked 14th out of 177 nations, suggesting that it’s one of the best-run nations on Earth. Either all but 13 countries are spectacularly corrupt or there’s something wrong with the index.

Yes, it’s the index. The definitions of corruption on which it draws are narrow and selective. Common practices in the rich nations that could reasonably be labelled corrupt are excluded; common practices in the poor nations are emphasised.

This week a ground-changing book called How Corrupt is Britain?, edited by David Whyte, is published. It should be read by anyone who believes this country merits its position on the index.

Would there still be commercial banking sector in this country if it weren’t for corruption? Think of the list of scandals: pensions mis-selling, endowment mortgage fraud, the payment protection insurance scam, Libor rigging, insider trading and all the rest. Then ask yourself whether fleecing the public is an aberration – or the business model.

No senior figure has been held criminally liable or has even been disqualified for the practices that helped to trigger the financial crisis, partly because the laws that should have restrained them were slashed by successive governments. A former minister in this government ran HSBC while it engaged in systematic tax evasion, money laundering for drugs gangs and the provision of services to Saudi and Bangladeshi banks linked to the financing of terrorists. Instead of prosecuting the bank, the head of the UK’s tax office went to work for it when he retired.

The City of London, operating with the help of British overseas territories and crown dependencies, is the world’s leading tax haven, controlling 24% of all offshore financial services. It offers global capital an elaborate secrecy regime, assisting not just tax evaders but also smugglers, sanctions- busters and money-launderers. As the French investigating magistrate Eva Joly has complained, the City “has never transmitted even the smallest piece of usable evidence to a foreign magistrate”. The UK, Switzerland, Singapore, Luxembourg and Germany are all ranked by Transparency International as among the least corrupt nations in the world. They are also listed by the Tax Justice Network as among the worst secrecy regimes and tax havens. For some reason, though, that doesn’t count.

The Private Finance Initiative has been used by our governments to deceive us about the extent of their borrowing while channelling public money into the hands of corporations. Shrouded in secrecy, stuffed with hidden sweeteners, it has landed hospitals and schools with unpayable debts, while hiding public services from public scrutiny.

State spies have been engaged in mass surveillance. And the police, adopting the identities of dead children, lying in court to assist false convictions and fathering children by activists before disappearing, have infiltrated and sought to destroy peaceful campaign groups. Police forces have protected prolific paedophiles, including Jimmy Savile, and – it is now alleged – a ring of senior politicians who are also suspected of the murder of children. Savile was shielded too by the NHS and the BBC, which has sacked most of the those who sought to expose him while promoting people who tried to perpetuate the cover-up.

There’s the small matter of our unreformed political funding system, which permits the very rich to buy political parties. There’s the phone-hacking scandal and the payment of police by newspapers, the underselling of Royal Mail, the revolving door a llowing corporate executives to draft the laws affecting their businesses, the robbing of the welfare and prison services by private contractors, price-fixing by energy companies, daylight robbery by pharmaceutical firms and dozens more such cases. Is none of this corruption? Or is it too sophisticated to qualify?

Among the sources used by Transparency International to compile its index are the World Bank and the World Economic Forum. Relying on the World Bank to assess corruption is like asking Vlad the Impaler for an audit of human rights. Run on the principle of one dollar, one vote, controlled by the rich nations while operating in the poor ones, the bank has funded hundreds of white-elephant projects that have greatly enriched corrupt elites and foreign capital while evicting local people from their land and leaving their countries with unpayable debts. To general gasps of astonishment, the World Bank’s definition of corruption is so narrowly drawn that it excludes such practices.

The World Economic Forum establishes its corruption rankings through a survey of global executives: the beneficiaries of the kind of practices I’ve listed in this article.

Its questions are limited to the payment of bribes and the corrupt acquisition of public funds by private interests, excluding the kinds of corruption that prevail in rich nations.

Transparency International’s interviews with ordinary citizens take much the same line: most of its specific questions involve the payment of bribes.

How Corrupt is Britain? argues that such narrow conceptions of corruption are part of a long tradition of portraying the problem as something confined to weak nations, which must be rescued by “reforms” imposed by colonial powers and, more recently, bodies such as the World Bank and the IMF.

These “reforms” mean austerity, privatisation, outsourcing and deregulation.

They tend to suck money out of the hands of the poor and into the hands of national and global oligarchs.

For organisations such as the World Bank and the World Economic Forum, there is little difference between the public interest and the interests of global corporations.

What might look like corruption from any other perspective looks to them like sound economics. The power of global finance and the immense wealth of the global elite are founded on corruption, and the beneficiaries have an interest in framing the question to excuse themselves.

Yes, many poor nations are plagued by the kind of corruption that involves paying bribes to officials. But the problems plaguing us run deeper. When the system already belongs to the elite, bribes are superfluous.

 

Peaceful protestor with cardboard coffin is arrested despite the Mayor, GLA and Met Police’s T.S.G being under judicial review for breaches in October – November & December. Democracy is Dead in Parliament Square.

Donnachadh McCarthy’s arrest happened as he held a coffin symbolising the death of UK democracy. The coffin carried the inscription “UK Democracy R.I.P. Killed by corporate billionaires.

OCCUPY DEMOCRACY

UKDemocracyRIP
Photo credit: Louis Mignot louisjtmignot@gmail.com
 
DEMOCRACY “ARRESTED” OUTSIDE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT
  • Protestor holding a coffin branded “UK Democracy R.I.P.” arrested on Parliament Square
  • Despite Judicial Review police disrupt peaceful pro-democracy protests under the cover of darkness
  • Freedom of the press threatened as NUJ members threatened with arrest and five arrestees include independent livestreamer

Under the cover of darkness the Metropolitan police’s Territorial Support Group (TSG) officers, on instruction from GLA Wardens, disrupted Occupy Democracy’s monthly protest in front of the Houses of Parliament. This is despite London Mayor Boris Johnson and the GLA being under Judicial Review for their erection of fences in October, November and December.

Around 200 Occupy Democracy supporters were threatened with arrest and five arrests were subsequently made in which large numbers of police targeted and, sometimes violently, picked off peaceful protesters. 

These arrests interrupted what was otherwise a packed programme of speakers, workshops, discussions…

View original post 916 more words

Degenerate Art – 1993, The Nazis vs. Expressionism (56 mins)

This is a documentary from 1993 by David Grubin (written, produced, and directed) about the art exhibit under the Nazi regime of what they considered to be the most corrupting and corrosive examples of what they called ‘Entartete Kunst’ or ‘Degenerate Art.’

The exhibit, which opened in July of 1937, was meant to be laughed at and despised. The film is not generally available (other than on VHS).

Personally, I could think of no better backdrop for the ideas and pathos of expressionist art than Nazi Germany, shown by a great deal of actual footage (most provided by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art – they had an exhibit of their own based on the event that same year).

The music includes Schoenberg, Hindemith, and Wagner. All of the art shown is referenced by name in the end credits.

 


 

THE ART THAT HITLER HATED

The Art That Hitler Hated The Sins of the Fathers BBC Imagine BBC Documentary NOV. 2014

 

Cartoonist Martin Rowson on the death of “The Great Moderniser” Abdullah of Saud and the truly dreadful tributes from Tony (‘Tis a pity he’s a whore) Blair and Bullingdon’s finest, David (Call Me Dave) Cameron. Fucking Warmongers and hypocrites All!

Cartoonist Martin Rowson on the death of “The Great Moderniser” Abdullah of Saud.

 

The sycophantic international ‘grieving’ for this Saudi despot is as sickening as the line up of representatives of repression on the Paris “Je suis Charlie Hebdo” march.
It’s all about the oil and BAe weapons sales, it’s The War Machine in attendance.

image
The Independent’s cartoonist, Dave Brown, in today’s edition of ‪#‎CharlieHebdo

Nick Clegg will today condemn calls for the revival of the so-called snoopers’ charter following the Paris terror attacks with the warning: “We do not make ourselves safer by making ourselves less free.”

The Deputy Prime Minister will put himself at odds with David Cameron who promised yesterday to give the intelligence services extra surveillance powers if he wins this year’s general election.

Mr Cameron pledged to bring in a “comprehensive piece of legislation that makes sure we do not allow terrorists safe space to communicate with each other”.

Senior Tories repeatedly attack their Lib Dem coalition partners for blocking proposals to allow the security services access to every person’s email and internet history as well as social media contacts.

Clegg warns of the danger of rushing in measures which “undermine the very freedoms we cherish” in reaction to terrorist outrages. And in this instance I have to agree.

Cameron and the Tories have been so opportunistic in using the Paris murders to push their totalitarian security agenda, it has been breathtaking!

Even George W Bush held back longer on draconian security enforcement following the 9/11 attacks!

In all the post-Paris grief, hypocrisy and hyperbole abounds from political leaders and media outlets. Yes, the attack was an act of evil; an inexcusable and merciless murder of innocent, unarmed victims.

I argue that none of us believes in an untrammelled right to free speech. We can all agree there are always going to be lines that, for the purposes of law and order, cannot be crossed; or for the purposes of taste and decency, should not be crossed. But we cannot let David Cameron and others use an incident of Islamofascist violence as an excuse to spy on us and as a means of compounding paranoia and fear of the other.

GCHQ already holds unprecedented abilities to intercept the online communications of citizens through its Tempora programme, as revealed in last year’s leaks by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. The difficulty for security services at the moment is that their technological capacities far outweigh the scope of the legislation that currently exists.

To some extent, the introduction of the Snooper’s Charter would be retrospective, looking to legally justify the abilities that GCHQ already have and already implement.

 

 


Since writing this I’ve discovered this article in yesterday’s edition of The New Statesman online BY LAUREN RAZAVI

(PUBLISHED 13 JANUARY, 2015 – 16:39)

Has terrorism already claimed its next victim Britain; our right privacy?

British officials have begun arguing in favour of stronger powers for the security services to intercept personal data.

 


 

David Cameron has said he will reintroduce the Snooper’s Charter if the Tories are re-elected in May 2015.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/jan/11/david-cameron-snoopers-charter-tory-election-win