Posts Tagged ‘war’

  • Author Paulo Freire wrote in his book “Pedagogy of the Oppressed”:

    “The generosity of the oppressors is nourished by an unjust order, which must be maintained in order to justify that generosity. “

     I was deeply shocked 3 days ago when I found out that the Royal British Legion gala Remembrance event was sponsored by the war monger corporations Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems!

    I wouldn’t even fill in my Census form because of Lockheed!

    The RBL does a huge amount of good work for people who would be destitute and struggling because of the MoD.
    But Fuck ME!
    Two of the most devastating warmonger corporations of the Military Industrial complex sponsoring a Remembrance event for those who had fallen in two World Wars???
    Absolutely in the worst possible taste imaginable!?

    http://on.rt.com/vo0ti8 LockHeed Martin and BAE Systems weapons manufacturers sponsor the Gala Poppy Ball.

    Remembrance charity ball sponsored by Lockheed, veterans and activists outraged

    Reuters / Luke MacGregor
    Anti-war activists have criticized the Royal British Legion for its decision to allow one of the world’s largest defense contractors to sponsor its annual ‘Poppyrocks Ball’.

    The ball, which was held last week in the prestigious HAC in the City of London, is hosted to raise money and awareness for the Royal British Legion, which “helps the whole Armed Forces community through welfare, comradeship and representation.”

    According to the Poppyrocks ball website, the event was organized by the Royal British Legion Young Professionals Branch, an organization to “educate and encourage” 18-40 year olds to donate to the charity.

    The charity are also considered to be the UK’s “custodian of Remembrance.” Their duties include coordinating the Poppy Appeal, an initiative designed to commemorate fallen and serving soldiers, and raise money to assist returning servicemen and their families.

    Earlier this month, Lockheed Martin, which has helped to produce the UK’s Trident weapons system, said it was “thrilled”to be the sponsor of the ball, especially as 2014 marked the centenary of the First World War.

    “We owe a great deal to those who have given so much themselves and our company strives to serve and honor those who have served us,” Lockheed Martin Chief Executive Stephen Ball Said.

    While the Royal British Legion has said that the traditional paper red and green poppies were about “remembrance and hope” and not a show of support for war, religion or politics, other groups have been critical about what is represents.

    “While many people wear [poppies] to remember the people who have died in wars, they are also being used to promote arms companies and the organizations they are associated with,” Lindsey German, convener of the Stop the War Coalition told RT.

    “The relationship only results in promoting current and future wars,” she added.

    Guardian columnist George Monbiot also expressed discomfort with the RBL’s choice of sponsor.

    “It turns out that @PoppyLegion strongly linked to arms trade. Until now I’ve bought a poppy every year. No longer,” he tweeted.

European Graduate School Video Lectures Link 1hr 10mins

Public open lecture for the students and faculty of the European Graduate School EGS Media and Communication Studies department program Saas-Fee Switzerland. – 2012 Slavoj Žižek.

Slavoj Žižek is the International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, a professor of philosophy and psychoanalysis at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switzerland and a visiting professor at the University of Chicago, Columbia University, the London School of Economics, Princeton University, The New School for Social research and the University of California, Irvine.

He has published over forty books and been the subject of two movies, Žižek! and The Perverts Guide To Cinema. In 1990 he ran unsuccessfully for president in Slovenia’s first democratic elections and he has been a consistently powerful voice in the world since then.

His essays are regularly published in the New York Times, Lacanian Ink, the New Left Review and the London Review of Books.

There is little in contemporary thought that Žižek has not explored on some level. From communism to Maoism, film studies to literature, and from Lenin to the issue of torture in the post-9/11 world, Žižek’s work has, and continues to, inform the dialogue that surrounds them.

Žižek’s first book in English translation, The Sublime Object of Ideology, examines the issues surrounding the placement of “sublime objects” in a regime’s iconography which allow it to transgress or alter commonly accepted moral law or thought. It is these objects—be it God, Fuhrer, Dear Leader or Land, the Flag, Democracy—that allow the regimes to “self-sanctify” their actions.

While much of Žižek’s work is strictly philosophical or psychoanalytical dealing with Hegel, Kant, Freud and Lacan, since 9/11 his work has become increasingly political, directly referencing the illegal actions taken by the Bush administration and the complicit nature of the European regimes of Blair, Sarkozy and Berlusconi.

Slavoj Žižek is the author of;

The Sublime Object of Ideology (1989), For They Know Not What They Do (1991), Looking Awry: an Introduction to Jacques Lacan through Popular Culture(1991), Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan (But Were Afraid To Ask Hitchcock) (1992), Enjoy Your Symptom! Jacques Lacan In Hollywood And Out (1992), Tarrying With The Negative (1993), Mapping Ideology (1994), The Indivisible Remainder (1996), The Plague of Fantasies (1997), The Abyss Of Freedom (1997), The Ticklish Subject: The Absent Centre of Political Ontology (1999), Contingency, Hegemony, Universality: Contemporary Dialogues on the Left (with Judith Butler and Ernesto Laclau) (2000), The Art of the Ridiculous Sublime, On David Lynch’s Lost Highway (2000), The Fragile Absolute or Why the Christian Legacy is Worth Fighting For (2000), On Belief (2001), The Fright of Real Tears (2001), Did Somebody Say Totalitarianism? (2001), The Puppet and the Dwarf (2003), Organs Without Bodies: On Deleuze and Consequences (2003), Iraq The Borrowed Kettle (2004) Violence (2008), First As Tragedy, Then As Farce (2009), and Living in the End Times (2010). Most recently, 2012, Žižek published his monumental Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism.